Forum Posts

Brian Ketterer
Jul 15, 2019
In CMSCA
Dr. Lowe has presented this final cut of "Shark Safety - Fishing" public awareness video. CSU, Long Beach SharkLab and Dr. Lowe are looking for your input on the message and overall content of the video. Please let us know what you think. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWb1UsgINWs
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Brian Ketterer
Jul 06, 2019
In CMSCA
Say goodbye to the days of tire tread soled "go-aheads", VW vans, and surfviving for the next swell and the solitude of an uncrowded secret spot. Surfing is an industry and one of many the professional marine safety operation should be pointing to when discussing the relevancy and importance of our aquatic safety programs. “Surfonomics” is an offshoot of natural resource economics and seeks to quantify the worth of waves, both in terms of value to the user and to the businesses which serve them, as well as, what cost is the public willing to pay to not lose the resource. So often the Lifeguard profession focuses on statistics related to how the operation is performing, or the superficial numbers of what we do in the realm of public safety every day. And while the number of preventative contacts, first aids, and lost children found are important, we cannot lose sight of the importance of our role in driving a healthy coastal economy. The economic benefit of surfing has been widely studied over the past decade and the numbers are important in telling a story. For instance, more than 3.3 million people surf annually and expend approximately $3.1 million each year just to make it to their favorite local breaks. One study suggests the City of San Clemente reaps more than $13 million in revenues from people just wanting to experience one little surf break, of many within the city limits, known as “Trestles”. A 2017 study suggests the activity of surfing generates more than $50 billion for the global economy. And on every beach sits not only surfers, but body boarders, kayakers, paddlers, swimmers, fishermen, walkers, joggers, and tourists all under the watchful eye of a professional lifeguard belonging to a marine safety operation which employs too few permanent positions and a dwindling candidate pool of seasonal staff all typically with salaries and hourly pay rates far below those of other uniformed public safety professionals. Today’s Marine Safety leader must to not only understand and analyze the safety tallies of each tower and to use those findings to manage our operations, but he or she must realize the importance of collecting and analyzing statistics related to surfonomics and all coastal economic factors to argue for the equipment needs and budgets to maintain healthy, clean, and well protected beaches and those which utilize them.
Surfing by the Numbers content media
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Brian Ketterer
Jul 04, 2019
In CMSCA
The USLA and National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are pleased to announce the availability of updated rip current safety material, including new beach signs and brochures. Lifeguard agencies can use the artwork to print their own signs and brochures and there's a place to include your agency logo (or that of the funder). See what's new at our Beach Safety and Drowning Prevention Educational Materialspage. New materials will be added throughout the summer.
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Brian Ketterer
Jun 26, 2019
In CMSCA
Ah, How I long for the days of Stand-up versus prone surfing enforcement discussions… More than 10 years after Laird Hamilton debuted the “simplicity” of the foil board we find the technology has reached the masses and raises (no pun intended) the dilemma of traditional versus next generation equipment into our line-ups. So what is a lifeguard agency to do? To better understand the sport and dispel rumors or simply increase awareness the CMSCA offers this discussion. First, you know you have issues when Kelly Slater’s first experience was less than graceful on a foil board. Compound that with those who can afford them are not Laird or Kelly or a professional by any stretch of your imagination (perhaps their imagination, but not yours…) And while the discussion of SUP vs. prone has, in most places been a sharing of space, managed only by cold stares, under-breath remarks and epitaphs, and simple Bravado the foil debate brings new discussion topics while ramping up the debate of surfing’s “open ocean space”. A “Hydrofoil” surfboard has a wing-like foil bolted to the underside, allowing the rider to move along a wave several feet above the ocean’s surface, thus reducing drag and increasing speed and maneuverability; however, the way in which the board handles is different transfers and even slight transfers in body weight can lessen control of the board. It is this metal foil blade which has traditional surfers standing up and requesting marine safety officials to prohibit the board in the line-up. The injuries suffered by Yu Tonbi Sumitomo from the blade-like foil he was riding early on are enough to give pause. The little town of Anglet, France, banned the technology and called the craft a “surfing guillotine” during the heated debates. While many of our agencies have code sections or law which restrict dangerous games or activities on the beach, they typically are limited to the shoreline and therefore don’t restrict a foil in the water. And Harbor and Navigation Codes are vague at best in defining what a “vessel” actually is when looking at a human-propelled device. Most agencies maintain the rules of the waves are predicated on surfing etiquette, or what is now coined, and the “Surfer’s Code” and experience and education is the baseline test for where and when a hydrofoil should be used. Whether your elected officials or your “self-proclaimed beach kings and queens” have voiced concern, the discussion raises similar questions which most of us have seen self-corrected between SUPs and traditional paddlers. While there is no easy answer for those of us serving all members of the public, it is best to ensure staff is reminding all surfers of the inherent risk of surfing, and any carbon fiber or fiberglassed projectile in the line-up (with or without a metal sword attached) or the person using it lacking in knowledge and ability should be directed to an area void of others and away from potential hazards. Take the time to understand the technology and speak with those who have mastered the craft prior to deliberating on the pros and cons of advancements in the sport of surfing. Be the experts within our profession and environment and be ready to provide a good answer for a complex argument. Best of luck and let us know when you have solved the riddle of why any surfer, prone, standing, grinching, foiling, or otherwise can’t acknowledge a black ball flag and thinks the perfect wave lies within the designated swim zone. https://www.surfline.com/surf-news/hydrofoil-surfing-expect-not-die-first-session/27446
En Garde, Touche, and Here Come the Hydrofoils content media
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Brian Ketterer
Jun 26, 2019
In CMSCA
CBS, produced this clip for the Sunday Morning show in May of 2016. https://www.cbsnews.com/video/a-tribute-to-lifeguards/
A Tribute to Lifeguards, CBS News in May of 2016 content media
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Brian Ketterer
Jun 10, 2019
In CMSCA
The California Marine Safety Chief's Association just completed the final draft version of Vehicle Operations for Lifeguards in hopes of creating a nationwide discussion and develop certification requirements for agencies to follow. The CMSCA developed minimum requirements for Code-3 Marine Safety vehicle operators, as well as, a workbook for instruction. The documents are similar to the Rescue Watercraft Operations packet approved by the USLA in 2018. Some key reminders for our drivers and wetseat passengers: Wear a seatbelt when on pavement and roadways- Protect yourself to serve others Slow down- How you respond to a call is just as important as what you do when you arrive Focus- Can you save a life if you never make it there? Remain calm- Observe, Inhale, Visualize, Repeat. You are in the driver's seat. Take control of how you respond to stress Clear your Vehicle before moving- Clear up, down, side to side, and underneath and repeat prior to putting the vehicle in "go" Turn to the left- Not just a country dance step. Reduce blind spots by turning to the driver's side when possible. Copies of the Draft documents and information regarding the San Diego Regional Training Academy can be made available by contacting the encinitaslifesavingassociation@gmail.com .
Drive to Arrive and Save Lives content media
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Brian Ketterer
Jun 04, 2019
In CMSCA
The CMSCA with the generous assistance of Dr. Chris Lowe of the California State University, Long Beach SharkLab and physician Dr. Brad Schwartz developed guidelines to be utilized by professional public safety services which are responsible for managing or responding to shark incidents along our California coastline. The United States Lifesaving Association's (USLA) American Lifeguard Magazine recently published an article on our efforts for all professional lifeguard agencies to discuss our work. Any agency needing information or guidelines set by the CMSCA please contact the CSU, Long Beach SharkLab at Chris.Lowe@csulb.edu or contact City of Encinitas Marine Safety Captain, Larry Giles at lgiles@encinitasca.gov . Donations to assist with shark attack victim Keane Hayes https://www.gofundme.com/keane-hayes-shark-attack-victim https://www.csulb.edu/shark-lab https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2019/06/04/paramedic-dad-punched-shark-five-times-save-his-daughter-who-lost-leg-attack/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.388f7a924c1c https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1001317700050920
Shark Incident Guidelines created by CMSCA and CSU, Long Beach SharkLab gain Nationwide Interest content media
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Brian Ketterer
Jun 03, 2019
In CMSCA
A few months back the CMSCA requested original artwork which would become the logo of the association. We have a few submittals and would love to receive more. Let us know what you think! LACo Lifeguard's very own Adam Uehara submitted the following
CMSCA is seeking artwork. content media
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Brian Ketterer
Jun 03, 2019
In CMSCA
The Encinitas Lifesaving Association (ELA) welcomes all Lifeguard professionals to share information and expertise concerning professional lifeguarding. We look forward to the discussion and insight of those who have the best job in the world!
Welcome to the CA Marine Safety Chiefs Associaton "Open Waters" Forum content media
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